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A PSYCHOMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE OHIO SCALES, SHORT FORM, PROBLEM SEVERITY DOMAIN, YOUTH- AND CAREGIVER-REPORT VERSIONS

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Title:A PSYCHOMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE OHIO SCALES, SHORT FORM, PROBLEM SEVERITY DOMAIN, YOUTH- AND CAREGIVER-REPORT VERSIONS
Authors:Laba, Tommie Mitsuko
Contributors:Nakamura, Brad (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Clinical psychology
evidence-based practices
factor analysis
Ohio Scales
psychometrics
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Ongoing treatment progress monitoring through empirically supported outcome measurement strategies has increasingly become an important aspect of community mental health systems. Tracking outcomes in a systematic way allows a variety of stakeholders to assess treatment progress from a response to intervention perspective, and thus can be used to help guide ongoing treatment planning and delivery efforts. Although there are numerous benefits to ongoing utilization of empirically-supported assessment strategies, frontline implementation can be difficult, especially in large community-based settings. As such, some stakeholders in our field have turned to developing shorter, more feasible, and easily interpretable assessment measures, such as the Ohio Youth Problem, Functioning, and Satisfaction Scales, which assesses for youth problems, functioning, hopefulness, and treatment satisfaction from a multi-informant perspective. The current study examined the extent to which the Ohio Scales Short Form, Problem Severity domain was able to perform as a reliable and valid measure within a large community youth mental health sample of multiethnic youth and families in Hawaiʻi. A total of 1,125 youth receiving services through the Hawaiʻi Child and Adolescent Mental Health Division’s system of care were studied in the current investigation. Confirmatory factor analyses pointed to a four-factor structure (i.e., Externalizing, Delinquency, Anxiety, and Depression) for both youth- and caregiver-report models, with subscale internal reliabilities slightly varying by informant type, but overall falling in the good to excellent ranges. Additionally, the majority of convergence patterns between Problem Severity domain subscales with related Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) subscales were significantly correlated in the expected directions. Though discriminative validity findings varied somewhat by informant type, Problem Severity subscale scores were mostly able to discriminate between youth with and without pertinent mental health diagnoses. Additionally, youth- and caregiver-report Problem Severity domain subscale and total scores were significantly correlated and in the predicted directions. Finally, significant youth improvement was evident at 3-month follow-up, and demonstrated the ability to detect pre-post changes of comparable magnitude to improvement detected using the CAFAS. Moreover, Problem Severity intake and 3-month follow-up scores were significantly and positively related to one another. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Pages/Duration:88 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69068
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Psychology


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