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BLURRED LINES: MULTIRACIAL EXPOSURE AND ITS EFFECT ON STEREOTYPING AND PREJUDICE TOWARDS STIGMATIZED GROUPS

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Title:BLURRED LINES: MULTIRACIAL EXPOSURE AND ITS EFFECT ON STEREOTYPING AND PREJUDICE TOWARDS STIGMATIZED GROUPS
Authors:Ansari, Shahana Michelle
Contributors:Pauker, Kristin (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Social psychology
Classrooms
Essentialism
Prejudice
Race
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Stereotypes
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Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:As our country continues to grapple with issues revolving around racial stereotypes and prejudice, scientists struggle to understand the underlying processes that lead to stereotyping and prejudice. Previous work suggests that race essentialist beliefs are associated with more stereotypical beliefs and more prejudiced attitudes toward racial outgroups. There are many factors that can influence race essentialist beliefs, but past research suggests exposure to racial diversity and exposure to multiracial individuals are influential in reducing race essentialism. The current study aims to: 1) investigate the unique and intersecting effects of exposure to diversity and exposure to multiracial individuals on race essentialist beliefs and, subsequently, on racial stereotypes and prejudice; and 2) replicate research demonstrating the mediating role of race essentialism on decreased racial stereotypes and prejudice. Results suggest that 1) exposure to multiracial individuals is only weakly related to lower race essentialist beliefs in academic contexts and 2) race essentialism affects racial stereotypes and prejudice driven by high status group favoritism but not low status group derogation. Theoretical implications and future directions are discussed.
Pages/Duration:75 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69067
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Psychology


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