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MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT OF ABERRANT SALIENCE, ANOMALOUS SELF-DISTURBANCES, AND PSYCHOTIC-LIKE EXPERIENCES

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Title:MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT OF ABERRANT SALIENCE, ANOMALOUS SELF-DISTURBANCES, AND PSYCHOTIC-LIKE EXPERIENCES
Authors:Meyer, Monet
Contributors:Masuda, Akihiko (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Clinical psychology
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:In the interest of improving early identification and intervention for psychosis-spectrum symptoms, researchers have identified early subjective changes in perception and experience that precede psychotic-like experiences, including aberrant salience and self-disturbances. Aberrant salience is the misattribution of significance to neutral stimuli and may be linked to atypical dopamine transmission. Self-disturbances include changes in the experience of the self, which may affect the top-down processing of new information, resulting in experiences or thoughts that are inconsistent with the individual’s external context, yet feel internally consistent. The interaction of these phenomena may result in positive psychosis-spectrum symptoms, ranging from innocuous psychotic-like experiences in the general population to hallucinations or delusions found in psychotic disorders. The present study examined the momentary dynamics of aberrant salience, self-disturbances, and psychotic-like experiences as they occurred in the daily lives of undergraduates in order to test four primary aims: (1) examine the ecological validity of existing measures, (2) examine autoregressive relationships to observe the state-versus-trait dynamics of these phenomena, (3) measure cross-lagged relationships between the precursory mechanisms and psychotic-like experiences to test Granger causality, and (4) examine the moderating role of self-concept clarity. The results provided support for the use of these measures to examine within-subject fluctuations, show evidence that carryover effects occur across time points, and show preliminary supportive evidence of Granger causality.
Pages/Duration:64 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69066
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Psychology


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