Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69054

IMPROVING SYNCOPE-RELATED SYMPTOMS IN ELDERLY CARDIOLOGY OUTPATIENTS BY PROVIDING STANDARDIZED PRINTED PATIENT EDUCATION

File Size Format  
Kam hawii 0085A 10546.pdf 3.21 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:IMPROVING SYNCOPE-RELATED SYMPTOMS IN ELDERLY CARDIOLOGY OUTPATIENTS BY PROVIDING STANDARDIZED PRINTED PATIENT EDUCATION
Authors:Kam, Kasey
Contributors:Wang, Chen-Yen (advisor)
Chan, Pon-Sang (advisor)
Nursing Practice (department)
Keywords:Nursing
Health education
cardiology
education
elderly
show 3 morefainting
outpatient
syncope
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Background: Syncope - also known as fainting - is defined as a sudden and transient loss of consciousness resulting in the inability to maintain postural tone with rapid recovery that follows. Studies report approximately 40% of the U.S. population will experience a syncopal episode in their lifetimes (Runser et al., 2017), with recurrent syncope occurring in 13.5% of Americans who experience syncope.
Purpose and Objectives: The purpose of this evidence-based practice (EBP) quality improvement project was to determine whether standardized printed patient education on syncope topics improves syncope symptomatology in elderly cardiology outpatients at Kuakini Medical Center.
Methods: Data were collected at two points. The first at an initial office visit via an author-developed pre-education survey that assessed for any history of syncope and any knowledge of lifestyle modifications to help avoid syncope. The second, at the patient’s follow-up visit approximately 60 to 90 days after the initial visit, via an author-developed post-education survey that assessed: any episode of syncope since the education was given, any improvement in symptoms, any increase or decrease in knowledge of lifestyle modifications, and any use of learned lifestyle modifications.
Results: Initially, 14 patients who met the inclusion criteria were identified. Half of them either did not show to their initial or follow-up appointments and failed to reschedule or could not understand the surveys and/or education due to the lack of a translator. A total of 7 patients completed all aspects of the methodology pipeline. All 7 patients reported a past history of fainting on their pre-education survey, and all 7 reported no episode of fainting at their follow-up visit. Five (71%) patients reported an improvement in their symptoms at follow-up, while two (29%) reported no improvement.
Discussion: The data collection period (September 2019 to January 2020) was short which disqualified patients who did not show to their appointments and could not reschedule in a timely manner. Subsequently, the already small sample size was reduced by half. In the future, a phone translating service may be considered in the event staff are unable to translate during the visit or the educational material should be translated by capable staff or sent out to be done by a qualified third-party. The data collection period should be extended to 6 months to a year.
Conclusion: Receiving standardized printed education on syncope topics may improve syncope symptomatology in elderly cardiology outpatients.
Pages/Duration:40 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69054
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: D.N.P. - Nursing Practice


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.