Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69046

EXPLORING A SHARED HISTORY OF COLONIZATION, HISTORICAL TRAUMA AND LINKS TO ALCOHOL USE WITH NATIVE HAWAIIANS LIVING IN RURAL HAWAII IN THE 21ST CENTURY

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Title:EXPLORING A SHARED HISTORY OF COLONIZATION, HISTORICAL TRAUMA AND LINKS TO ALCOHOL USE WITH NATIVE HAWAIIANS LIVING IN RURAL HAWAII IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Authors:Greywolf, Cynthia Taylor
Contributors:Casken, John (advisor)
Nursing (department)
Keywords:Nursing
American Indians
Colonization
Historical Trauma
Intergenerational trauma
show 2 moreNative Hawaiians
unresolved grief
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Abstract
American Indigenous populations, American Indians (AIs), and Alaska Natives (ANs) have experienced historically traumatic events over the past 500 years, and Native Hawaiians (NHs) over the last 240 years from contact with Europeans, and the subsequent colonization, and appropriation of traditional homelands. Colonization resulted in massive losses of people, and culture including loss of cultural knowledge, traditions, land, and identity. The proximal issues of racism, discrimination, oppression, and marginalization have compounded the problem leaving a long legacy of unresolved historical trauma and a complex form of chronic Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and unresolved grief among individuals in the tribes and groups. Indigenous scholars have posited historical trauma as a prime cause of the current social pathology among AI/AN/NH populations through the inter-generational transmission of stress leading to high rates of suicides, homicides, domestic violence, child abuse, alcohol, and substance use, and mental health disparities. AI researchers have emphasized the need to study historical trauma in relation to specific sociocultural contexts. Research exploring the impact of colonization and historical trauma has been conducted with AIs and ANs demonstrating a link between historical trauma, and increased physical and mental health disparities, alcohol, and other substance use. Little is known about the behavioral risks of substance use that may have resulted from colonization and historical trauma in NHs. There are specific cultural and historical losses which are unique to NHs who are at a higher risk for poorer mental health outcomes, and alcohol and other substance use compared to other ethnic populations in Hawaii. NHs have a history, similar to AIs/ANs, which elevates the importance of exploring their lived experience, and perceptions of colonization, historical trauma and links to alcohol use in the 21st century.
Pages/Duration:203 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69046
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Nursing


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