Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69041

EVALUATING A PILOT PADDLING PROGRAM TO IMPROVE INTENTIONS, BEHAVIORS, AND ATTITUDES FOR HEALTHIER LIFESTYLES IN SEDENTARY NATIVE HAWAIIAN ADULT PARTICIPANTS

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Title:EVALUATING A PILOT PADDLING PROGRAM TO IMPROVE INTENTIONS, BEHAVIORS, AND ATTITUDES FOR HEALTHIER LIFESTYLES IN SEDENTARY NATIVE HAWAIIAN ADULT PARTICIPANTS
Authors:Cummins, Kerri
Contributors:Qureshi, Kristine (advisor)
Nursing (department)
Keywords:Nursing
Attitudes
Behaviors
Hawaiian
Health
show 2 moreIntentions
Paddling
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Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Background: Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Native Hawaiians are 10 % more likely to be diagnosed with and 70% more likely to die from complications of heart disease than their Caucasian counterparts. Modifying risk factors using a culturally integrated preventative approach is vital to addressing heart disease in the Native Hawaiian community.
Purpose and Objectives: The goal of this evidence-based quality improvement project was to pilot a paddling program specifically designed to improve intentions, behaviors, and attitudes for healthier lifestyles in sedentary Native Hawaiian adults. This project leveraged the infrastructure of two existing organizations to provide a pathway for participants to engage in a culturally unique and supportive environment that promotes healthy behavior.
Methods: Seven (7) participants were recruited through contacts at Papa Ola Lokahi, the New Hope Canoe Club, and word-of-mouth among community members. The Short-Form (SF)-12 and the student-modified Health Promotion Model (HPM) self-reporting surveys were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the project.
Results: Five (5) participants completed the program and submitted self-reporting forms during sessions 1 and 12. Results from the HPM and SF-12 completion responses showed a positive trend in the intention to initiate and complete the paddling program, and the perceived health status of participants.
Implications for Practice: There are many barriers to effective management and prevention of heart disease. Finding meaningful and creative ways to address this discrepancy in those disproportionately affected is vital to minimizing barriers and improving health outcomes. Paddling is a culturally appropriate form of physical activity and provides an opportunity for Native Hawaiians to become more active in a supportive and culturally sensitive group environment.
Pages/Duration:36 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69041
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: D.N.P. - Nursing Practice


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