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Healthcare Provider Education on Trauma Informed Yoga for Veterans and Active Duty Personnel Diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

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Item Summary

Title:Healthcare Provider Education on Trauma Informed Yoga for Veterans and Active Duty Personnel Diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Authors:Vosters, Julie
Contributors:Mobley, Joseph (advisor)
Nursing (department)
Keywords:Nursing
Mental health
PTSD
veterans
yoga
show 1 moreyoga therapy
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Abstract
Background: Approximately 6% to 14% of veterans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and many continue to experience symptoms with conventional treatment. To improve patient care outcomes, the Veterans Health Administration set forth a complementary and integrative health (CIH) directive. Yoga, one of the approved modalities, has been found to support reduction of PTSD symptoms. As an emerging therapeutic modality, many healthcare providers and patients may be unaware of yoga, yoga therapy, and trauma informed yoga to the degree needed to ensure appropriate use for optimal patient care. Purpose: This evidenced based quality improvement project assessed healthcare providers’ familiarity and knowledge about the appropriate use of yoga as therapy for veterans and active duty personnel diagnosed with PTSD before and after an educational session. This project intended to provide healthcare providers with relevant information about the therapeutic use of yoga to optimize benefits and reduce risks to patients. Methods: Five full-time PTSD residential recovery program healthcare providers attended a 2 hour educational program about: the history and current trends of yoga and yoga therapy, trauma informed yoga, and guidelines for healthcare providers. Participants completed a pre-educational session questionnaire and a post-educational session questionnaire. Results: Healthcare providers showed statistically significant improvements in familiarity and knowledge of yoga and yoga therapy relative to the management of PTSD. Qualitative responses indicated the education program was generally well received and every individual indicated they would incorporate the knowledge into clinical practice. Discussion: Educational programs with pertinent information about the differences between yoga, yoga therapy, and trauma informed yoga may improve healthcare provider awareness and understanding of the appropriate use of these modalities. As therapeutic use of yoga is incorporated into clinical care, improved healthcare provider awareness and understanding may reduce risks and adverse effects as well as improve benefits, safety, and efficacy for veterans and active duty personnel with PTSD.
Pages/Duration:55 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69036
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: D.N.P. - Nursing Practice


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