Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69007

THE ROLE OF SOCIAL INTEGRATION AND SENSE OF CONNECTEDNESS IN ONLINE AND HYBRID COURSES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON PERSISTENCE RATES AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AMONG MILITARY STUDENTS

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Title:THE ROLE OF SOCIAL INTEGRATION AND SENSE OF CONNECTEDNESS IN ONLINE AND HYBRID COURSES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON PERSISTENCE RATES AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AMONG MILITARY STUDENTS
Authors:Merc, Eduard 'Oumuamua
Contributors:Irvine, Christine S. (advisor)
Learning Design and Technology (department)
Keywords:Educational technology
Education
Military Learners
Nontraditional Students
Online and Hybrid Courses
show 3 morePersistence
Sense of Connectedness
Social Integration
show less
Date Issued:2020
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:ABSTRACT
Social integration and a sense of connectedness are important elements in many attrition and student persistence models in higher education. Due to the increased popularity and offerings of distance education courses in recent years, this research study explored the role of social integration and a sense of connectedness among military students in online and hybrid course modalities to better understand effects on persistence rates and academic performance among this fast-growing population of nontraditional learners.
This study used quantitative analysis combined with focus group findings to examine the perception of social integration and a sense of connectedness using Bean and Metzner’s Adult Student Persistence Model (1985) as its theoretical framework. The study sought to answer six research questions related to social integration, sense of connectedness, persistence rates, and academic performance in two course modes (online, hybrid). The site for the study was a local military-friendly academic institution that has one of the largest enrollments of military learners in Hawai`i.
Ratings for social integration and sense of connectedness were low in both course types. Statistical tests showed no significant differences between the online and hybrid course modalities in terms of course persistence rates and final grades of students or in measures of social integration and sense of connectedness. A Pearson product-moment correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationships among social integration, sense of connectedness, persistence, and academic performance. Lastly, regression analysis indicated only one variable (sense of connectedness) was statistically significant in terms of predicting academic performance (grade) among the military students in online courses. Focus group findings revealed that military students placed importance on social integration and a sense of connectedness in both course modes but perceived it differently. Some desired to have a stronger relationship with faculty, while others put emphasis on being understood better as an adult learner among their peers and instructors. A finding of this study was that better understanding of the need of military learners and how they prefer to learn could lead to improved course persistence and academic performance regardless of what course modality they participate. This study has implications for hybrid and online class educators, administrators, as well as policy makers, to more effectively support the growing student population of military students in programs across the nation.
Pages/Duration:178 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69007
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Learning Design and Technology


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