Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/67392

Unassisted repeated reading: Exploring the effects of intensity, treatment duration, background knowledge, individual variation, and text variation on reading rate

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Title:Unassisted repeated reading: Exploring the effects of intensity, treatment duration, background knowledge, individual variation, and text variation on reading rate
Authors:Lynn, Ethan M.
Keywords:repeated reading
reading fluency
L2 reading
reading rate
background knowledge
show 1 moremixed effects
show less
Date Issued:15 Apr 2021
Publisher:University of Hawaii National Foreign Language Resource Center
Center for Language & Technology
Citation:Lynn, E. M. (2021). Unassisted repeated reading: Exploring the effects of intensity, treatment duration, background knowledge, individual variation, and text variation on reading rate. Reading in a Foreign Language, 33(1), 30-54. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/67392
Abstract:Two groups of English as a second language students engaged in a fourteen-week repeated reading (RR) treatment: (1) a 3x group (n = 16), which engaged in three readings per session, and (2) a 5x group (n = 15), which engaged in five readings per session. Reading rate and background knowledge were measured at five points to assess the effect of treatment length as well. Results from a mixed effects repeated measures ANCOVA model showed that neither treatment group nor treatment length had a significant effect on reading rate, but background knowledge did. The model also revealed that the fixed effects (e.g., treatment, duration, and background knowledge) explained 8.1% of the variation in reading rates (R2 = .081). The random effects of individual variation and text variation explained 0.9% (R2 = .009) and 0.3% (R2 = .003) of variance in reading rate respectively, meaning the entire model could explain 9.3% of the variation (R2 = .093). It was concluded that reading three times per session was more efficient than reading five times per session, and background knowledge is a variable that must be controlled for in reading studies
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/67392
ISSN:1539-0578
Volume:33
Issue/Number:1
Appears in Collections: Volume 33, No. 1


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