Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/66569

Population status, habitat dependence, and reproductive ecology of Bahama Orioles: a critically endangered synanthropic species.

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dc.contributor.author Price, Melissa R.
dc.contributor.author Lee, Valerie A.
dc.contributor.author Hayes, William K.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-03-18T21:37:34Z
dc.date.available 2020-03-18T21:37:34Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Price, M. R., V. A. Lee, and W. K. Hayes (2011) Population status, habitat dependence, and reproductive ecology of Bahama Orioles: a critically endangered synanthropic species. Journal of Field Ornithology 82(4):366–378.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/66569
dc.description.abstract Recent elevation of critically endangered Bahama Orioles (Icterus northropi) to species status promptedustoevaluate theirpopulation status,habitatuse,andbreedingecology.Fromsurveys,weestimatedthat at least 141 to 254 individuals remain globally, with 90 to 162, 24 to 44, and 27 to 48 individuals remaining on North Andros Island, Mangrove Cay, and South Andros Island, The Bahamas, respectively. Orioles were observed nesting exclusively in anthropogenic habitat (residential and agricultural land), but home ranges also included nearby pine forest and coppice (dry broadleaf forest). Most nests (40 of 46, or 87%) were in nonnative coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), with native Sabal palmetto and Thrinax morrisii, and an introduced Brassaia actinophylla also used. Trees selected by orioles for nesting were significantly taller, less likely to have shrubs underneath, further from cover, and had more palm trees nearby than randomly selected palm trees. Three of eight nests with known contents were parasitized by Shiny Cowbirds (Molothrus bonariensis). Lethal yellowing disease recently devastated coconutpalmsandreducedthenumberoforiolesonNorthAndros,butpalmsonMangroveCayandSouthAndros remain healthy. The juxtaposition of anthropogenic habitat to suitable native habitats may be more important than any single factor for Bahama Orioles, especially for breeding adults and fledged young. Conservation of coppice habitat, at high risk for agricultural and residential development, is crucial for survival of this critically endangered synanthropic species.
dc.format.extent 13
dc.language.iso en-US
dc.subject breeding behavior
dc.subject brood parasitism
dc.subject lethal yellowing
dc.subject nest site selection
dc.subject Shiny Cowbird
dc.subject double clutch
dc.subject nest construction
dc.subject nesting success
dc.subject population estimate
dc.subject breeding phenology
dc.subject clutch size
dc.subject chick nestling diet
dc.subject helper at the nest
dc.subject double brood
dc.title Population status, habitat dependence, and reproductive ecology of Bahama Orioles: a critically endangered synanthropic species.
dc.type Papers
dc.type.dcmi Text
prism.publicationname Journal of Field Ornithology
prism.volume 82
prism.number 4
prism.startingpage 366
prism.endingpage 378
Appears in Collections: Hawaii Wildlife Ecology Lab


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