Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/66181

PATTERNS OF CONNECTIVITY IN CORAL REEF FISHES ACROSS THREE SPATIAL SCALES

File Size Format  
Coleman_hawii_0085A_10433.pdf 2.71 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:PATTERNS OF CONNECTIVITY IN CORAL REEF FISHES ACROSS THREE SPATIAL SCALES
Authors:Coleman, Richard Ronald
Contributors:Bowen, Brian W. (advisor)
Zoology (department)
Keywords:Zoology
connectivity
genomics
Hawaii
population genetics
show 2 moreRAD sequencing
Red Sea
show less
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:The vast majority of reef fish have a life history consisting of a pelagic larval phase of typically 20 to 60 days and followed by larval settlement where they remain through their juvenile and adult phase. It is during the pelagic larval phase that nearly all dispersal across great distances is accomplished. Understanding connectivity and dispersal pathways, as well as identifying the underlying mechanisms influencing these patterns are essential to properly understand how biodiversity is generated and maintained in the sea. The scale in which these patterns can be identified can also illuminate evolutionary processes, and can inform conservation strategies. Since direct observation of larvae is impractical, a variety of methods have been developed to characterize connectivity and dispersal patterns in marine organisms. Here, I incorporated several different genetic based approaches to assess connectivity across a suite of spatial scales: across ocean basins (Indian and Pacific Oceans), across an isolated archipelago (Hawaiian Archipelago), and at the island scale (Oʻahu). From an ocean basin scale, the results of this work identified historic barriers to dispersal, refugia during the Pleistocene, and recovered cryptic diversity. At the archipelago and island scale, this work shows how biogeographic distribution can be predictive of dispersal potential. recovered previous unknown management units and showed the complex system of dispersal pathways and the role these systems play in regards to informing management strategies. By evaluating connectivity across different spatial scales, this work highlights the different processes facilitating evolution as well as enhancing our ability to inform conservation and management goals.
Pages/Duration:118 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/66181
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Zoology


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.