Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/64497

Innovation Culture, R&D Intensity, and Firm Innovation

File Size Format  
0610.pdf 347.72 kB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Innovation Culture, R&D Intensity, and Firm Innovation
Authors:Liu, Shan
Zhang, Muyu
Gao, Baojun
Keywords:Topics in Organizational Systems and Technology
employee-perceived innovation culture
firm innovation
firm-proclaimed innovation culture
glassdoor
show 1 morer&d intensity
show less
Date Issued:07 Jan 2020
Abstract:This paper aims to investigate the value of two types of innovation culture, namely employee-perceived and firm-proclaimed innovation culture. We quantify how employees perceive innovation culture by analyzing the text of 191542 employee reviews on Glassdoor and identifying the presence of firm-proclaimed innovation culture from their official websites. The results indicate that employee-perceived innovation culture has a positive influence on innovation output whereas firm-proclaimed innovation culture does not. Moreover, R&D intensity negatively moderates the effect of employee perceived innovation culture on firm innovation, such that the effect of employee perceived innovation culture is lower when R&D intensity is higher. This finding contradicts the observation of previous studies that used cross-sectional survey data. Nevertheless, our finding is consistent with the view that innovation culture cultivates the intrinsic motivation of employees, but the symbiotic control that comprises the increase of R&D intensity weakens it.
Pages/Duration:10 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/64497
ISBN:978-0-9981331-3-3
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2020.755
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: Topics in Organizational Systems and Technology


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons