Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63957

Early Regulations of Distributed Ledger Technology/Blockchain Providers: A Comparative Case Study

File Size Format  
0175.pdf 334.11 kB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

dc.contributor.author Scholl, Hans Jochen
dc.contributor.author Pomeshchikov, Roman
dc.contributor.author Rodríguez Bolívar, Manuel Pedro
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-04T07:30:49Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-04T07:30:49Z
dc.date.issued 2020-01-07
dc.identifier.isbn 978-0-9981331-3-3
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63957
dc.description.abstract Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLTs) such as Blockchain have been heralded for their potential to fundamentally disrupt traditional industries and longstanding practices in private and public business-es. In the financial sectors, for example, quite a number of novel financial technology (fintech) services based on DLT/Blockchain have been introduced with cryptocur-rencies representing prominent cases. While the already highly regulated financial sectors have emerged as ear-ly targets for DLT/Blockchain induced disruption, a diverse set of other areas, such as healthcare record keeping, insurance record keeping, industrial and retail supply chain management, property registries, citizen identification systems, and voting systems to name a few, has also come into the focus of DLT/Blockchain innovation. These new types of services might be in need of both complementary and novel regulations for DLT/Blockchain-based services. Interestingly, smaller jurisdictions such as Bermuda, Gibraltar, Malta, and Liechtenstein were among the first to provide advice and regulation for DLT/Blockchain service provisions. The study compares these early regulatory approaches to each other and discusses the prospects of DLT/Blockchain service regulation based on the study’s findings. DLT/Blockchain service regulation appears to incorporate predominantly principle-based rather than rule-based regulations, which makes the regulation en-forcement a uniquely individual case-based task.
dc.format.extent 10 pages
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Proceedings of the 53rd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject Blockchain, DLT, Tokenization, and Digital Government
dc.subject distributed ledger technology
dc.subject blockchain
dc.subject token economy
dc.subject regulation
dc.subject digital government
dc.title Early Regulations of Distributed Ledger Technology/Blockchain Providers: A Comparative Case Study
dc.type Conference Paper
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doi 10.24251/HICSS.2020.218
Appears in Collections: Blockchain, DLT, Tokenization, and Digital Government


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons