Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63534

Emerging policy problems related to ubiquitous computing: Negotiating stakeholders’ visions of the future

Item Summary

Title:Emerging policy problems related to ubiquitous computing: Negotiating stakeholders’ visions of the future
Emerging policy problems related to ubiquitous computing
Authors:Winter, Jenifer Sunrise
Keywords:Ubiquitous Computing
Mobile Computing
Policy
Emerging Issues
Date Issued:2008
Citation:Winter, J. S. (2008). “Emerging policy problems related to ubiquitous computing: Negotiating stakeholders’ visions of the future.” Knowledge, Technology & Policy, 21, 191–203. doi:10.1007/s12130-008-9058-4.
Abstract:This paper provides an overview of the human-centered vision of Ubiquitous Computing and draws on research examining slowly emerging problems over a long-term time frame in the emerging Ubiquitous Computing environment. A six-phase process employing scenario planning, electronic focus groups, and problem assessment surveys harnessed the insight of 165 individuals from diverse backgrounds and regions throughout the State of Hawaii. Distinct differences were found between the problem identification of specialists (policymakers and systems designers) and non-specialists (everyday citizens), and there were significant differences found in the problem assessment between groups. The greatest differences in both phases emerged from social and psychological issues related to the emerging Ubiquitous Computing environment. It is argued that in addition to enormous technical changes, Ubiquitous Computing will serve to blur sociotechnical boundaries throughout the environment, challenging existing distinctions between humans and machine intelligences. As the potential for extending human capabilities via computing and communications technology is actualized in coming decades, what it means to be human will be a major source of public policy conflicts, and the early identification of problems related to these changes is essential in order to mitigate their impacts and socially negotiate a more desirable future.
Description:Peer-reviewed journal article
Pages/Duration:31
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63534
DOI:10.1007/s12130-008-9058-4
Volume:21
Appears in Collections: School of Communications Faculty & Researcher Works


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