Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63512

Goal-Directed Self-Monitoring as an Ecological Momentary Intervention for Disordered Eating Thoughts and Behaviors

File Size Format  
Stefano hawii 0085A 10335.pdf 818.33 kB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Goal-Directed Self-Monitoring as an Ecological Momentary Intervention for Disordered Eating Thoughts and Behaviors
Authors:Stefano, Emily
Contributors:Latner, Janet (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Clinical psychology
Body checking
Eating disorders
Ecological momentary intervention
Self-monitoring
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:The present study investigated the use of self-monitoring with goal-directed feedback as an ecological momentary intervention for reducing the frequency of disordered eating and body checking behaviors over a two-week period. This study also examined if self-monitoring significantly reduced baseline eating disorder pathology at post-test. Sixty-seven college-age women with subclinical eating disorder pathology were randomized into one of three groups: a non-directed EMI group that engaged in two weeks of self-monitoring (NG-EMI group); a goal-directed EMI that, in addition to completing the two-week self-monitoring period, received daily text messages containing goal-directed and psychoeducation; and a control group that completed only the pre- and post-tests. Participants in the EMI groups were prompted via text message five times per day to record recent disordered eating and body checking behaviors as well as their state body dissatisfaction (i.e., BISS) and state negative affect (i.e., PANAS-X). All participants completed online pre- and post-test measures of body shape concern, global eating disorder pathology, and body checking and avoidance behavior. EMI participants also reported feasibility and acceptance of the EMI procedures at post-test. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed greater momentary disordered eating and body checking significantly predicted greater state body dissatisfaction and negative affect. Results also suggested both EMI groups reported significantly fewer disordered eating and body checking behaviors over time. Body checking, but not disordered eating behaviors, reduced significantly faster in the G-EMI group compared to the NG-EMI group. The G-EMI group reported less eating disorder pathology at post-test compared to the NG-EMI group and control group. EMI participants indicated overall feasibility and acceptance of the self-monitoring intervention. The present results suggested self-monitoring, specifically with the addition of goal-directed and psychoeducational information, might be an effective intervention for reducing disordered eating and body checking behaviors over time in women with subclinical eating disorder pathology. Clinical implications, study limitations, and future directions for research are discussed.
Pages/Duration:118 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63512
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Psychology


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.