Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63482

EFFECT OF WILD-HARVEST ON A COMMERCIALLY IMPORTANT SEAWEED: A CASE STUDY OF MAZZAELLA LAMINARIOIDES (RODOPHYTA, GIGARTINACEAE) IN SOUTH-CENTRAL, CHILE

File Size Format  
LopezVargas_hawii_0085A_10382.pdf 2.39 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:EFFECT OF WILD-HARVEST ON A COMMERCIALLY IMPORTANT SEAWEED: A CASE STUDY OF MAZZAELLA LAMINARIOIDES (RODOPHYTA, GIGARTINACEAE) IN SOUTH-CENTRAL, CHILE
EFFECTO DE LA COSECHA DE UN ALGA DE IMPORTANCIA COMERCIAL: CASO DE ESTUDIO DE MAZZAELLA LAMINARIOIDES (RODOPHYTA, GIGARTINACEAE) EN CENTRO-SUR, CHILE
Authors:Lopez Vargas, Gioconda T.
Contributors:Ticktin, Tamara (advisor)
Botany (department)
Keywords:Botany
Wildlife conservation
Ecology
antioxidants
ethnobotany
show 4 moreHarvest
Mazzaella laminarioides
population ecology
Seaweeds
show less
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:To characterize the uses of seaweed, and investigate the socio-economical and ecological impact of harvest form wild-stocks, I focused on a case-study of Mazzaella laminarioides in South-Central Chile. First, I carried out a literature review and ethnobotanical surveys to compile lists of the species of seaweeds used in Chile and in South-Central Chile. I recorded that just 3% of the species of seaweeds present in Continental Chile had traditional and/or contemporary use, and nine of them are currently used for production of polysaccharides. Then I used chemical analyses to test if species used for food and medicine have high nutritional values and antioxidant potential. The results showed high nutritional values and antioxidant content for the species studied, especially for the species Pyropia columbina, which presented high values of proteins, minerals and antioxidants.
I also described the international and local context of intensification of seaweed extraction and the socioeconomic changes related to the polysaccharides market in South-Central Chile, I found changes in harvester demography, incorporation of new technologies, and increasing intensity and frequency of harvest.
Then, I used manipulative harvest experiments and chemical analyses to evaluate how environmental factors and harvest affect the antioxidant potential of Mazzaella laminarioides; and I found no significant effects of abiotic, biotic predictors, or harvesting, on antioxidant potential. I also recorded a tendency for a negative relationship between temperature and total phenolic compounds.
Lastly, I used a manipulative experiment to test the effects of harvest strategies on population size and reproductive potential of a population of M. laminarioides from South-Central Chile. During one harvesting season, I monitored the effects of harvest treatment on variables related to population size and reproductive potential. By the end of the experiment, the treatment that showed a recovery for most of the variables studied, particularly for population size, was hand-pull once. However none of the treatments recovered for total number of reproductive fronds, which can have negative effects on the population at long term. The results of the study suggest that the most sustainable strategy would be pulling fronds by hand, rotating harvesting areas and waiting longer to revisit the same spot. This would provide more and bigger fronds, and reduce the negative impact of harvest on the population.
Pages/Duration:155 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63482
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Botany


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.