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Do Enrollment in Special Education and Having a Learning Disability Influence Symptoms of Depression in Young Adulthood?

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Title:Do Enrollment in Special Education and Having a Learning Disability Influence Symptoms of Depression in Young Adulthood?
Authors:Johnston, Laura
Contributors:Mossakowski, Krysia (advisor)
Sociology (department)
Keywords:Sociology
Depression
Learning Disability
Special Education
Young Adulthood
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Although some research has been conducted to assess the effectiveness of Special Education programs, very little research has been focused on the mental health outcomes of children placed in Special Education in the United States. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), my goal in this study was to examine the relationship between placement in Special Education (Wave I) and symptoms of depression in young adulthood (Wave III). Results indicated that, after controlling for demographic characteristics, parental socioeconomic background variables, educational and employment outcomes, educational expectations, school satisfaction, prior depressive symptoms, and self-esteem, students who had received Special Education services or had a learning disability had higher levels of depressive symptoms in young adulthood (Wave III). Additionally, students who had received Special Education services or had a learning disability were more likely to have expressed depressive symptoms in Wave I. These findings suggest that students with a learning disability and those placed in Special Education are more likely to suffer from symptoms of depression both in school (intermediate and high school) and upon transitioning out of high school and into young adulthood. I hope that the findings of this study inspire others to build upon this research by exploring mental health outcomes of children who receive Special Education services. It is also my hope that this (and future) research will be used to develop targeted curriculum and supports which will facilitate positive mental health outcomes for children enrolled in Special Education and which will help alleviate the mental distress faced by students in Special Education transitioning into young adulthood.
Description:M.A. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:53 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63266
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Sociology


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