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GENDER AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: THE CASE OF THE FISH AGGREGATING DEVICE (FAD) IN TO’ABAITA, SOLOMON ISLANDS

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Title:GENDER AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: THE CASE OF THE FISH AGGREGATING DEVICE (FAD) IN TO’ABAITA, SOLOMON ISLANDS
Authors:Saeni, Enly Labuinao
Contributors:Chai, Sun-Ki (advisor)
Sociology (department)
Keywords:Sociology
Economic development
Gender
Solomon Islands
To'abaita
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Kastom or traditional societies are often portrayed as the root of gender inequalities. It is often argued that in order to create gender equality, there is a need to transform them from traditional to modern societies, a lineal transition that reflects the trajectories of modernization. Here, I argue that kastom and traditional societies are not necessarily the roots of gender inequality. Rather, gender inequality is a product of the process of change, including neoliberal economic development, which creates new and unequal gender expectations and relationships. This is a complex process of intersections between traditional and modern changes that have resulted in changes to mutual gender responsibilities that were characteristic of traditional societies. Here, I use the case of To’abaita society in Malaita in Solomon Islands to show how economic development projects create and perpetuate gender inequalities, and how traditional gender relations influence the processes and outcomes of economic development projects. The study shows that in the To’abaita society, there is no such word in the local dialect that is equivalent with the English word, ‘gender.’ In the To’abaita language, the terms wane-wane ni bona’a and kini-kini ni bona’a are used, which are actually a reference to someone’s sex – male and female – rather than gender. When international organizations used economic development to change relationships between men and women it disrupts society and development is slow. However, when international organizations focus on empowering both men and women in their traditional roles and responsibilities, it gives them more power to pursue with other economic development aspirations to improve their lives. In this study I used kastom and traditional societies referring to the To’abaita society, especially how To’abaitans claimed themselves as being a man and woman in their own views and sensibilities, and in general how Solomon Islanders define their own society as dynamic, changing, functioning and surviving over time.
Description:M.A. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:140 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63264
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Sociology


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