Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63255

RELATIONSHIPS OF GEOPOLITICAL, ETHNIC, AND MORAL IDENTITY PROFILES ON NARCISSISM, ALTRUISM, AND POLITICAL IDEOLOGY: A LATENT PROFILE ANALYSIS

File Size Format  
Cantwell_hawii_0085A_10187.pdf 1.12 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:RELATIONSHIPS OF GEOPOLITICAL, ETHNIC, AND MORAL IDENTITY PROFILES ON NARCISSISM, ALTRUISM, AND POLITICAL IDEOLOGY: A LATENT PROFILE ANALYSIS
Authors:Cantwell, Michele Nicole
Contributors:Maynard, Ashley E. (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Developmental psychology
Social psychology
Psychology
Emerging adulthood
Identity development
show 3 moreLatent profile analysis
Narcissism
Political ideology
show less
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:The social contexts in which we develop and participate play a significant role in shaping our ideologies, the attitudes we hold toward others, and how we view ourselves in relation to society. Extensive research illustrates that various identity domains can shape political ideology. However, little psychological research has taken a person-centered approach toward integrating domains of identity toward understanding their combined impact on outcomes and ideologies in relationship to others within geopolitical groups (e.g., groups within a community, local, or global level). As the developmental stage of emerging adulthood within the United States presents a unique intersection of both highly salient identity work, and a phase of life legally defined by new roles as political agents within the U.S., this population was chosen as the focus of this study. Using an online sample of 970 emerging adults across the U.S., the aims of this research were a) to uncover profiles of identification across several domains of identity through latent profile analysis, and b) to measure the relationships among those latent identity profiles to the civic and social outcome measures of narcissism, altruism, and political ideology. Five distinct latent profiles emerged; labeled for dominant identity domains, they include High Achievers, Moderate Achievers, Moral Civic Explorers, Moral Nationals, and Civic Nationals. These profiles were significantly differentiated across all outcome measures of narcissism, altruism, and political ideologies, suggesting that membership in such profiles is related to social and civic attitudes and behaviors. Theoretical implications of these findings include an increased understanding of how identity domains may be integrated and how these influence attitudes and behaviors in relating self and society. Practical applications of these findings may include better informed strategies toward conflict resolution, public education on social issues, and political campaign strategy.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:142 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63255
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Psychology


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.