Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63254

THE ROLE OF SELF-COMPASSION, DISTRESS TOLERANCE, AND SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERFECTIONISM AND DISORDERED EATING

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Title:THE ROLE OF SELF-COMPASSION, DISTRESS TOLERANCE, AND SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERFECTIONISM AND DISORDERED EATING
Authors:Rand-Giovannetti, Devin
Contributors:Latner, Janet (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Clinical psychology
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Eating disorders are associated with high levels of distress, functional impairment, and morbidity. Perfectionism has been consistently identified as an important factor in the etiology and maintenance of disordered eating, and as a promising target for treatment efforts. To address the detrimental effects of perfectionism on disordered eating, further research is needed to better understand what mechanisms may influence the relationship between these variables. The purpose of the current study was to examine factors identified as potential mediators and moderators of the relationship between perfectionism and disordered eating. Specifically, 1) self-compassion, distress tolerance, and social problem solving were assessed as mediators, 2) body image dissatisfaction and gender were tested as moderators, and 3) exploratory covariates were assessed as additions to the model. Data were collected from a sample of undergraduate students (N=280) using an online questionnaire battery. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesized relationship. A measurement and structural model meeting criteria for good fit were developed. An examination of the structural pathways found that distress tolerance emerged as a robust, statistically significant mediator of the relationship between perfectionism and disordered eating. Implications and future directions are discussed.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:138 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63254
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Psychology


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