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HORIZONTAL PARENTING AND GROWTH IN SOCIAL COMPETENCE IN CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

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Title:HORIZONTAL PARENTING AND GROWTH IN SOCIAL COMPETENCE IN CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES
Authors:Conover, Olivia Denise
Contributors:Floyd, Frank J. (advisor)
Psychology (department)
Keywords:Psychology
intellectual disability
parent-child interactions
parenting
social competence
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Children with intellectual disabilities (ID) often have difficulties with competent social behavior. One way that these children might develop social skills is through reciprocal or “horizontal” interactions with their parents, which, when paired with low rates of “vertical” or directive parenting behaviors, allow the children opportunities to practice competent social behaviors. The current study examined how parents’ positive reciprocity and frequency of directives were related to the development of social competence in children (N = 172, ages 6 to 18) with ID. Dependent measures included socially competent interaction behaviors with their parents and broad social competence across settings. Parent-child behaviors were assessed in an observed family interaction task and using a micro-analytic, event-based coding system. Children’s broad social competence was assessed using parent and teacher reports of adaptive social behavior at three time points over a 5-year period. It was predicted that parents’ high use of horizontal and low use of vertical behavior would be associated with children’s greater socially competent behavior with their parents. Moreover, it was hypothesized that parents’ high horizontal and low vertical behavior and children’s relatively greater socially competent behavior with parents would predict their greater concurrent broad social competence and growth in social competence across time. Multiple linear regression and multi-level modeling analyses were used. The results showed that parents’ relatively higher positive reciprocity and relatively fewer directives with their children predicted children’s own greater socially competent behavior with them in observed family interaction tasks. Furthermore, although the findings were sparse and limited to demographic subgroups, there was some support that parents’ horizontal and vertical behaviors predicted both children’s concurrent broad social competence and change in their social competence in the hypothesized directions. The findings suggest that focusing on the quality of parent-child interactions might be a fruitful avenue for interventions aiming to improve social skills for children with ID.
Description:M.A. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:65 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63250
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Psychology


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