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ON AN EVOLUTIONARY DEVELOPMENTAL METHODOLOGY FOR PIN-JOINT FRAMEWORK OPTIMIZATION

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Title:ON AN EVOLUTIONARY DEVELOPMENTAL METHODOLOGY FOR PIN-JOINT FRAMEWORK OPTIMIZATION
Authors:Clark, Victor
Contributors:Kobayashi, Marcelo (advisor)
Mechanical Engineering (department)
Keywords:Mechanical engineering
evolutionary algorithms
L-systems
structural topology optimization
trusses
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:The formal investigation into optimal structures, called topology optimization, commenced from the 1904 paper of A.G.M. Michell. While impractical for real constructions, the criteria considered therein allow for a determination of the limit of material economy attainable for truss structures, called Michell structures. These analytical solutions are a useful tool for benchmarking, but have been solved only for a small number of simple cases. The usual computational approaches for identifying these optima rely on a presupposed ground structure, which covers the design space with an initial assemblage of members and joints. While denser ground-structures provide for more refined optima, the stipulation of an initial structure (i.e., topology) artificially restricts the allowable optima.
In the present work, we are concerned with the development and application of a biologically inspired methodology for the study of layout (size, shape, and topology) optimization in pin-jointed frameworks. The methodology is based on the formalism of map L-systems, whose grammar generates purely topological information. This topology is encoded and optimized using an evolutionary algorithm coupled to a non-linear programming method for sizing and shape optimization. Three benchmark test cases are examined which show the gains attainable when a ground-structure is not presupposed.
Description:M.S. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:39 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63207
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Mechanical Engineering


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