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BEYOND RECOGNITION: INDIGENOUS LAND RIGHTS AND CHANGING LANDSCAPES IN INDONESIA

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Title:BEYOND RECOGNITION: INDIGENOUS LAND RIGHTS AND CHANGING LANDSCAPES IN INDONESIA
Authors:Fisher, Micah Radandima
Contributors:Suryanata, Krisnawati (advisor)
Geography (department)
Keywords:Geography
Agrarian Change
Indigenous [adat] rights recognition
Indonesia
social forestry
show 1 moreyouth studies
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Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:This dissertation examines the applications of transnational movements advocating for indigenous land rights recognition as a solution for addressing rapid land use change taking place across Indonesia. Such initiatives are also framed as part of a growing and increasingly powerful discourse around the world on the possibility of indigenous land rights to support decolonization and social justice, that at once assumes environmental benefits. This research applies a political ecology approach centered around the Kajang community in South Sulawesi, the first community to gain indigenous land rights recognition since the landmark constitutional court decision that stated historical indigenous land enclosures were unconstitutional. The research took place over a period of 21 months by combining geospatial analysis with ethnographic engagement among policymakers, advocacy organizations, village development authority, and farmer groups. By following the processes of how certain crops are fixed, legitimated, and reproduced on the landscape, and contextualizing indigenous recognition with land relations, this research finds that the way social movements connect with local authority to secure land rights serves to reinforce and accelerate the terms of dispossession among those most in need of land.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:201 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63184
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Geography


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