Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63176

VOICES OF FILIPINA ACADEMIC SUCCESS: PINAY EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN DOCTORAL PROGRAMS

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Title:VOICES OF FILIPINA ACADEMIC SUCCESS: PINAY EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN DOCTORAL PROGRAMS
Authors:Quinajon, Rachel Amey
Contributors:Heck, Ronald (advisor)
Education (department)
Keywords:Higher education administration
DOCTORAL EDUCATION
FILIPINAS
HIGHER EDUCATION
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:There has been limited research on American doctoral education and even less scholarship exploring Filipinx higher education experiences. Utilizing a qualitative research methodology, this exploratory research seeks to expand the understanding on Filipina educational experiences in doctoral programs, creating a space to share non-traditional student narratives and to center voices that have often been silenced in higher education research. Using the conceptual framework of Peminist Critical Theory and case study approach, 11 self-identified Filipinas shared their doctoral educational journeys from two research institutions, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and University of California, Los Angeles.
The guiding research questions focused on the overall doctoral educational experiences of Filipinas as they progressed through their programs and sought to identify critical factors that aided their success including the presence of support networks, intrinsic motivators, and supporting program structures. The emergent themes from their overall doctoral educational experiences indicated that their educational journey provided growth and transformation (motivating purpose, being Pinay, navigating the academic road, lifelines) and distinguished the program features and support systems which facilitated academic success (intrinsic reinforcements, extrinsic growth opportunities, academic and non-academic support systems). The findings presented unique voices that illuminated the experience of impostor phenomenon, decolonization, community-based orientation, and importance of relationships, thus extending our overall knowledge of doctoral education narratives which may deviate from traditional student experiences.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:227 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63176
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Education


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