Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63171

Trust me! Examining how group membership and self-disclosure affects trust perceptions between strangers

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Item Summary

Title:Trust me! Examining how group membership and self-disclosure affects trust perceptions between strangers
Authors:Casale, Robert
Contributors:Gasiorek, Jessica (advisor)
Communicology (department)
Keywords:Communication
Communication
Groups
Self-Disclosure
Trust
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:In this study, group membership and self-disclosure intimacy were manipulated to examine if they impacted participants’ perceptions of trust in a stranger. It was hypothesized that ingroup strangers and intimate self-disclosers would garner more trust and be more likely to receive a reciprocal self-disclosure than outgroup strangers and those who did not self-disclose intimately. In an experiment, participants (n = 184) were asked to report their perceptions of a stranger they read about in two contexts where group membership was determined by either geographic origin or age. Findings showed that ingroup intimate self-disclosers elicited significantly more trust when compared to ingroup non-intimate self-disclosers. When geographic origin was the criterion for group membership, ingroup intimate self-disclosers were more likely than non-intimate self-disclosers to receive a reciprocal self-disclosure. Also, when age was the criterion for group membership, ingroup intimate self-disclosers received significantly more intimate reciprocal self-disclosures than outgroup members or non-intimate self-disclosers. These findings support the idea that group membership and self-disclosure intimacy can impact perceptions of trust in and communicative behaviors towards others.
Description:M.A. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:79 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63171
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Communicology


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