Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63149

Foliar fungal diversity related to Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) antagonism and its implications for pathogen resistance in the endangered Hawaiian Nioi (Eugenia koolauensis)

File Size Format  
Chock_hawii_0085O_10200.pdf 18.06 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Foliar fungal diversity related to Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) antagonism and its implications for pathogen resistance in the endangered Hawaiian Nioi (Eugenia koolauensis)
Authors:Chock, Mason Kamalani
Contributors:Amend, Anthony S. (advisor)
Botany (department)
Keywords:Microbiology
Ecology
Plant pathology
Biocontrol
Conservation
show 4 moreCulture-based
Diversity
Forestry
Hyperparasitism
show less
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:An introduced fungal rust pathogen, Austropuccinia psidii, is a primary component contributing to the decline of the critically endangered Hawaiian Eugenia tree (Eugenia koolauensis). Once common on the islands of Oʻahu and Molokaʻi, E. koolauensis is now limited to 11 populations with a total of ~99 mature individuals on the island of Oʻahu. Hundreds of asymptomatic fungal species live within the E. koolauensis leaf tissue, and recent studies imply the composition of these foliar fungal communities can affect the severity of pathogens such as A. psidii. Using molecular and culture-based methods, I characterized the foliar fungal community and introduced these diverse fungi in to microbiome of E. koolauensis leaves infected by A. psidii. By manipulating the composition of the leaf microbiome, via application of a leaf slurry and single isolate spore-slurries, I demonstrated how increased fungal diversity promotes resistance to A. psidii in E. koolauensis. These results highlight the potential of harnessing native microbes to induce disease resistance within a conservation context.
Description:M.S. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:58 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63149
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Botany


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.