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AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE, ESSENTIAL DWELLINGS: A HYBRID SINGLE-FAMILY HOME SOLUTION TO HAWAI’I’S HOUSING CRISIS

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Title:AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE, ESSENTIAL DWELLINGS: A HYBRID SINGLE-FAMILY HOME SOLUTION TO HAWAI’I’S HOUSING CRISIS
Authors:Moorman, Jay
Contributors:Rockwood, David (advisor)
Architecture (department)
Keywords:Architecture
affordability
dwelling
hawai'i
single-family home
show 2 moresustainability
tensile fabric
show less
Date Issued:2019
Publisher:University of Hawai'i at Manoa
Abstract:Abstract
Dwelling costs (design, materials, construction) often prohibit residents from considering custom single-family homes. Existing homes and production homes are often not optimized for individual family lifestyles, climate, or environment – they are often one-size-fits-all, cookie-cutter homes rather than simply a suitable dwelling (the Urban Dictionary defines “cookie-cutter” as “marked by sameness and a lack of originality; mass-produced. Often used to describe suburban housing developments where all the houses are based on the same blueprints and are differentiated only by their color.” )
Sustainable building emerged to combat diminishing resources and to better promote stewardship of the environment. Often, green building materials and techniques are more expensive.
Essentialism applied to single-family residential architecture dictates right-sized, functional homes satisfying needs (rather than wants) and facilitating living (lifestyle).
I will identify methods to improve affordability, sustainability, and suitability of single-family homes. Consider an analogy of human wellbeing. Successful dieting/fitness depend on eating the right quantities of healthy food and exercising; more importantly, successfully achieving holistic health depends on modifying behavior and establishing healthy habits. How do we build at reduced cost and with less environmental impact by right-sizing dwellings and using lightweight and/or less material? I will utilize analytical research, case study research, and applied research with qualitative and quantitative analysis to address single-family dwellings in Hawai’i. The outcomes will include: 1) a single-family dwelling system incorporating tensile fabric in the spirit of affordability, sustainability, and essentialism and, 2) potential paths to address obstacles to lean structure construction and acceptance/adoption. This research is relevant and critical as we approach the sustainable yield point for affordable housing and natural resources in Hawai’i, and it could cultivate a collective cultural mindset whereby affordable, sustainable, essential living becomes the status quo, a norm, a healthy habit.
Description:Arch.D. Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2019
Pages/Duration:127 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/63138
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: D.ARCH. - Architecture


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