Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62766

The Association of Significant Depressive Symptoms on the Risk of Falls: A Prospective Cohort Study from the Health and Retirement Study.

File Size Format  
2018-05-ms-motchnik.pdf 1.14 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:The Association of Significant Depressive Symptoms on the Risk of Falls: A Prospective Cohort Study from the Health and Retirement Study.
Authors:Motchnik, Tania M.
Contributors:Public Health (department)
Keywords:Depressive symptoms
falls
community-dwelling older adults
cognitive impairment
BMI
Date Issued:May 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Falls are one of the leading causes of injury-related morbidity and mortality among the older adult population. Medical costs attributable to falls is projected to increase as the population grows over the next decades. Depression is one of the most common neurological disorders experienced among older adults. Utilizing data from the Health and Retirement Study, this study investigated the association between significant depressive symptoms (SDS) on the risk of falls among individuals aged 65 and up. After adjusting for potential confounders, individuals with SDS had a 25% increased risk for incident falls when compared to individuals without SDS (risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22, 1.27). Both sex and BMI were found to be effect modifiers in the association of SDS on fall risk. This study suggests that depressive symptoms is a risk factor for falls, consistent with previous literature.
Description:M.S. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62766
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Public Health


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.