Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62748

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Intention Scale for Providers-Direct Items.

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Title:A Psychometric Evaluation of the Intention Scale for Providers-Direct Items.
Authors:Mah, Albert C. S.
Contributors:Psychology (department)
Keywords:Evidence-based practices
dissemination
therapists
theory of planned behavior
Date Issued:May 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Research on the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP)
suggests that there are numerous factors that influence EBP utilization in community mental
health settings. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Intention Scale for
Providers-Direct Items (ISP-D; 16 items), a questionnaire designed to assess therapists’ attitudes,
subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral intentions towards using EBPs.
Participants were youth community mental health providers from the State of Hawaii’s
Departments of Education (n = 130) and Health (n = 81). A confirmatory factor analysis was
conducted with the total sample to evaluate the factor structure of the ISP-D, which provided
support for a revised 14-item ISP-D (Model 3) measure that met benchmarks for adequate to
good model fit (i.e., c2 (69) = 117, RMSEA = .057, SRMR = .068, CFI = .944, TLI = .926).
Additional analyses were conducted to examine the ISP-D’s reliability and convergent validity.
All subscales of the revised ISP-D (Model 3) demonstrated acceptable to good internal
consistency, with the exception of the perceived behavioral control scale (⍺ = .63; questionable).
The majority of convergent validity correlation patterns between the ISP-D and related
constructs were statistically significant and in predicted directions. Implications and suggestions
for future research are discussed.
Description:M.A. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62748
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Psychology


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