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Pacific Island Studies: Education

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Title:Pacific Island Studies: Education
Authors:Ah Wong, Laulia H.
Contributors:Professional Ed Practice (department)
Date Issued:Aug 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Students educated in Hawaiʻi are exposed to a unique environment comprised of distinctive
ecological qualities and cultural values. Educational programs that emphasize cultural
knowledge, skills, and values help students develop the social emotional balance and intellectual
mindset to succeed in college, careers and communities. Punahou School's Holokū Pageant is a
cultural performance-based program aimed at fostering a deeper understanding of the Hawaiian
culture through hula (dance), mele (songs), and oli (chants). This study explores the impact of
the Punahou School's Holokū Pageant through practitioner inquiry that focused on addressing the
research question: "How does the Punahou School's Holokū Pageant impact participans'
connection to Hawaiʻi?" Using an indigenous research design and methodologies, the study
examines the experiences of program participants' connection to Hawai'i and my experiences in
the program as practitioner leader through moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy) and moʻolelo
(storytelling). Twelve Holokū Pageant participants, representing a succession of generations
organized by decades (1980-1989; 1990-1999; 2000-2009; 2010-2016), participated in semistructured,
one-to one interviews and the findings identified four major themes: Building
Belonging, Fostering Pilina (Relationships), Developing Aloha, and Enriching a Sense of
Hawaiʻi. Insights gained from this study have promoted a deeper understanding of both Native
Hawaiian and Non-Hawaiian participant experiences in relation to the perceived value of the
Holokū Pageant.
Description:Ed.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62708
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ed.D. - Professional Practice


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