Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62612

A Qualitative Study Using Phenomenology: Investigation of the Lived Experience of Second Degree Master's Entry Nurses as they Transition in their Advanced Practice Role.

File Size Format  
2018-08-phd-farr.pdf 391.51 kB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:A Qualitative Study Using Phenomenology: Investigation of the Lived Experience of Second Degree Master's Entry Nurses as they Transition in their Advanced Practice Role.
Authors:Farr, Shirley M.
Contributors:Nursing (PhD) (department)
Keywords:transition
second-career
second-degree
master’s entry program in nursing
entry-level master’s
show 2 moreadvanced practice registered nursing
nurse practitioner
show less
Date Issued:Aug 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Significance: Transition to advanced practice can be a challenge for students who are successful clinical bedside nurses. Second-career master’s entry students experience several transitions within their nursing educational process. Investigating the process that they go through the first 2 years after completing their graduate education and becoming Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) was valuable in understanding the consequences/outcomes of their transition as it relates to role performance, clinical competence/judgment, professional competence, and satisfaction. Transition occurs throughout the stages in life. Transition is as an evolving process related to multiple situations in life experiences.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experience of the second career masters’ entry nurse as he or she transitions in the APRN role as a Nurse Practitioner (NP).
Method: The study design was qualitative, exploratory, and involved in-depth focus group interviews using a phenomenological method of inquiry. The sample was purposeful, with recruitment from Azusa Pacific University’s second-career Entry-Level Master’s program. The selected participants have graduated from their nursing program and have been working as NPs in an outpatient clinical setting from 1 to 24 months.
Results: Seven main themes emerged from the focus group discussions: feeling overwhelmed, gaining confidence, being humble, being a life-long learner/educator, weaving previous degree and life experience, recognizing gaps and challenges in APRN education, and practicing in a familiar environment to ease the transition.
Conclusions and Implications: Participants were able to transition to their NP role within the first 12 months. Implications for further research include the need to compare different entry-level master’s nursing programs that have an NP focus, examine traditional Master of Science NPs, and expand the timeframe to 3 to 5 years in practice.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62612
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Nursing


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.