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To Be Iina At'e: Development and Implementation of a Dine Methodology to Assess Past, Present and Future Water Sources Within the Cho'ho'tsoi Valley on the Navajo Nation.

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Title:To Be Iina At'e: Development and Implementation of a Dine Methodology to Assess Past, Present and Future Water Sources Within the Cho'ho'tsoi Valley on the Navajo Nation.
Authors:Yazzie, Aissa T.
Contributors:Natural Res & Environmentl Mgt (department)
Keywords:Cho’ho’tsoi
Navajo
Diné methodology
water security
Indigenous research paradigm
show 1 moreAutoethnography
show less
Date Issued:Aug 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:In the southwestern part of the United States, tribal people are facing severe droughts,
shifts in seasonal climate, increases in storm surges, and regional temperature increases. Water
security is a significant concern for the Navajo Nation, who have been experiencing a drought
for more than a decade. Over 30% of Navajo’s living on the reservation live without running
water, and 40% have to haul water to meet their daily needs. There are severe water
infrastructure deficiencies throughout the Navajo Nation. This research addresses water security
concerns of my home community in a rural and arid landscape in St. Michaels, Arizona on the
Navajo Nation. At an elevation of 6,500 to 7,500 feet and 11 inches of precipitation a year
Cho’ho’tsoi valley and plateau is a semi-arid, high desert plateau and canyon environment that is
extremely susceptible to drought. To understand past, present, and future water sources within
the Cho’ho’tsoi valley, in a culturally appropriate manner, I addressed four questions:
1. How do I, as a Diné woman, conduct scientific research in my community?
2. Where were/are the water sources located in Cho’ho’tsoi valley?
3. How have the water sources changed in the last fifty years?
4. Are the current water sources – livestock wells, safe for human consumption?
Grounded in Indigenous methodologies, developed using a Diné research paradigm, and based in
ceremony, this research incorporates three major Diné concepts A) Hózhó, B) Ké, C) Sa’ah
Naagháí Bik’eh Hózhó. This methodology is used to conduct ground surveys, archival research,
water quality testing, and an autoethnography analysis to create a holistic understanding and
genealogy of the Cho’ho’tsoi valley’s water resources.
Description:M.S. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62587
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Natural Resources and Environmental Management


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