Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62433

Cognitive Disease, Metabolic Disease, and Inflammation in the Honolulu Asia Aging Study: Connnecting the Dots between Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, and Fibrinogen.

File Size Format  
2017-05-phd-lee-thomas.pdf 1.22 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Cognitive Disease, Metabolic Disease, and Inflammation in the Honolulu Asia Aging Study: Connnecting the Dots between Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, and Fibrinogen.
Authors:Lee, Thomas H. W.
Contributors:Epidemiology (department)
Date Issued:May 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Metabolic diseases and cognitive diseases are two of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As medical technology and research continues to evolve and improve, the proportion of persons over 65 years of age will continue to increase. This dissertation presents analysis aimed to understand connections between inflammation, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease/dementia. The first study looks at the relationship between insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s disease/dementia. The relationship between inflammation, via fibrinogen, and insulin resistance is investigated in the second study. Finally, the third study investigates the association between fibrinogen and type 2 diabetes. This dissertation utilized data from the Honolulu Asia Aging study, a longitudinal cohort of Japanese-American men who were identified using 1960 U.S. Census data and selective service registration records from World War II.
The author found that subjects who were insulin resistant at later life had decreased odds of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Carriers of the APOE ε4 allele had at 50% increased odds of dementia and 60% increased odds of Alzheimer’s disease. Subjects with elevated fibrinogen levels at later life observed increased odds of prevalent insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, even after adjusting for potential confounders.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62433
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Epidemiology


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.