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Sympathetic Imagination and the Concept of Face: Narratives of Blindness in the Long Nineteenth-Century.

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Title:Sympathetic Imagination and the Concept of Face: Narratives of Blindness in the Long Nineteenth-Century.
Authors:Nagado, Madoka
Contributors:English (department)
Date Issued:Aug 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:This dissertation explores how sympathy conditions blind narratives, and also how Otherness is constituted within them. Arranged in three sections, “Recognizing Blindness,” “Representing Blindness,” and “Retelling Blindness,” I examine the nineteenth-century uses of “sympathy” in the literary representation of blindness. Drawing upon Emmanuel Levinas’ (1906-1995) concept of “face,” I read each narrative as an example of how historically and generically people’s sympathy towards Others has been presented, transmitted, and re-presented. What I call the “sympathetic imagination” represents the point of contact between the understanding of disabilities in the nineteenth century and its relation to Levinas’ ethical encounter with alterity, as I argue that each narrative uses “face” as a trope to represent the extended sympathies and enduring dilemmas provoked by encounters with blindness.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62422
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - English


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