Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62404

Reconfigurable Liquid-Metal Circuits and Antennas: Magnetic and Pressure-Based Actuation for Improved Performance at Microwave Frequencies

File Size Format  
Combs hawii 0085O 10034.pdf 1.74 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Reconfigurable Liquid-Metal Circuits and Antennas: Magnetic and Pressure-Based Actuation for Improved Performance at Microwave Frequencies
Authors:Combs, Anthony Wayne
Contributors:Shiroma, Wayne A. (advisor)
Electrical Engineering (department)
Keywords:Electrical engineering
antennas
ferrofluid
liquid metal
microwave
show 2 morereconfigurable circuits
rf
show less
Date Issued:Dec 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:The focus of this thesis is on reconfigurable liquid-metal circuits and antennas designed to operate at radio- and microwave frequencies. Two new actuation methods for manipulating liquid metal, ferrofluidic actuation and pressure-point actuation, are presented. The first method presented, ferrofluidic actuation, utilizes the physical deformation of ferrofluid in response to a magnetic field to displace, or transport, liquid metal from one location to another. This technique is demonstrated and shown in a functional RF switch. The second method described in this work, pressure-point actuation, enables small volumes of liquid metal, referred to as nodes, to be split apart or merged together to incrementally alter the length or shape of a liquid-metal conductor.
Description:M.S. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
Pages/Duration:47 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62404
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Electrical Engineering


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.