Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62371

The Motivation and Decision-Making Process of Elementary Education Majors in Hawaii.

File Size Format  
2018-05-med-kim-maikai.pdf 416.48 kB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:The Motivation and Decision-Making Process of Elementary Education Majors in Hawaii.
Authors:Kim, Maika'i K.
Contributors:Educational Psychology (department)
Date Issued:May 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Choice of a college major is an important decision that college students make because it guides
their personal, academic, and career goals. Although there is research on what motivates students
to pursue a major in general, there is a lack of in-depth literature on motivation for specific
majors. Because of the need for more teachers in Hawaiʻi, this study focused on what motivated
students to major in elementary education. This qualitative study used a grounded theory
approach to study the motivation and decision-making process of first year elementary education
majors at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Twelve students were interviewed. A theoretical
model was developed that describes how early student experiences, interactions with others, and
engagement activities shaped students’ understandings of the teaching profession, and led to
their decision to major in elementary education. Nine students initially majored in another
subject, but switched to education for reasons such as having experiences in their original field
that did not match with their interests or they struggled academically. Before committing to the
major, students reflected on how well it fit them and the challenges they were willing to
overcome, such as the desire to improve classroom management skills. Students reflected on
how their experiences in the program had met their expectations and validated their choice of
major.
Description:M.Ed. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62371
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.Ed. - Educational Psychology


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.