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The Journey After: A Phenomenological Examination of Teachers' Transfer of Learning from a Two-Year Professional Development Program.

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dc.contributor.author Padua, Jennifer F. M.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-28T19:52:15Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-28T19:52:15Z
dc.date.issued 2018-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62358
dc.subject transfer of learning
dc.subject professional development
dc.subject phenomenology
dc.title The Journey After: A Phenomenological Examination of Teachers' Transfer of Learning from a Two-Year Professional Development Program.
dc.type Thesis
dc.contributor.department Education
dcterms.abstract This phenomenological study investigated lessons learned and factors affecting transfer of learning by participants who were involved in a 2-year reading professional development program (Pacific CHILD) in a remote area in the Western Pacific. The transfer of learning process was examined through the use of focus groups, semi-structured interviews, surveys, and artifacts. Individual and group descriptions were utilized to capture lived experiences and generate themes to formulate lessons learned. Results from this study showed that Pacific CHILD had a positive impact; teacher efficacy affected transfer of learning; and teachers preferred specific instructional practices to transfer. New positions and responsibilities given to participants, frequent changes, and conflicting conditions were factors affecting the transfer of learning for teachers. Implications for future studies include creating local supports after the conclusion of externally funded professional development programs, and examining the broader scope on how the frequency of transferring teachers to different instructional positions effect change.
dcterms.description Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
dcterms.language eng
dcterms.publisher University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
dcterms.rights All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
dcterms.type Text
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Education


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