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Navigating Our Past, Present, and Future using Mo‘olelo: Sitting beside Our Ancestors.

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Title:Navigating Our Past, Present, and Future using Mo‘olelo: Sitting beside Our Ancestors.
Authors:Lum, Anna Lee P. M.
Contributors:Education (department)
Date Issued:Dec 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Often relegated as fictitious accounts of ancient people who have long since past, many
of our Native Hawaiian moʻolelo remain unspoken, unsung, unread. Overlooked and
undervalued, they wait in silence like unopened books on dusty shelves anticipating that special
moment when someone reaches over to savor the stories of our people.
Moʻolelo are seldom included within the classroom curriculum, thus, continuing the
colonial practice of denying Kanaka ʻŌiwi students access to learning their Hawaiian history,
language and culture through a Hawaiian lens. A strong Indigenous education is grounded in
curriculum and pedagogy congruent with traditional knowledge, culture, and practices at its
core.
In this research project, I investigated the role of moʻolelo with a fourth grade students
at a Hawaiian-serving school. The haumāna created videos depicting moʻolelo that they had
learned and found of interest. The source for these moʻolelo may have stemmed from a family
member, class-related reading, or cultural practitioner. Five Hawaiian language and culture
teachers and five cultural practitioners were interviewed about the importance of moʻolelo
upon viewing the fourth grade students’ moʻolelo videos. The participants expounded upon the
strengths of the students’ storytelling abilities and ways to improve upon them. The
participants’ collective knowledge provided guidance and instruction as to how educators might
effectively integrate moʻolelo within their classroom practices.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62353
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Education


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