Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62284

Netflix and Chilling: Binge-Watching Behaviors and the Cultivation Effects of Horror Television Shows.

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Title:Netflix and Chilling: Binge-Watching Behaviors and the Cultivation Effects of Horror Television Shows.
Authors:Humphries, Sheana J. K. Y.
Contributors:Communicology (department)
Keywords:cultivation theory
time compression
horror genre
first-order effects
second-order effects
Date Issued:Aug 2018
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:This study investigates various elements of cultivation theory on television viewing behaviors in different time compression formats. Colloquially known as “binge-watching,” viewing several episodes of a television show, back-to-back, is becoming more prominent with entire series readily available on any mobile device. However, research on the cultivation effects associated with time compression on television viewing behaviors is sparse, with most knowledge focused on the influence of total viewing time and exposure to various genres. This study expands work on cultivation theory by analyzing both the amount of viewing and the time frame in which the viewing occurred, specifically examining horror genre television shows and the different first-order and second-order effects that may be cultivated. This investigation found some evidence for the relationship between the number of hours spent watching horror shows and first-order effects. Additionally, there were some differences between viewing horror shows in a compressed versus non-compressed format on first-order effects. However, there was no significant relationship between number of hours spent watching horror shows and second-order effects and no significant difference between compressed and non-compressed viewing of horror shows on second order effects.
Description:M.A. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2018.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62284
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Communicology


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