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Life History Strategies and Individual Variation in Men's Desire to Appear Muscular.

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Title:Life History Strategies and Individual Variation in Men's Desire to Appear Muscular.
Authors:Aune, Alexander K.
Contributors:Communicology (department)
Keywords:Life history theory
self-presentation
male muscularity
evolutionary psychology
Date Issued:Dec 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Self-presentation has been widely studied by scholars interested in verbal and nonverbal
communication. Within a mating context, previous theories of emphasize the motive of
appearing physically attractive. However, people are unlikely to adopt identical strategies to
present themselves as attractive, but previous theories cannot explain this variation. I propose
and test in this research a life history (LH) hypothesis of self-presentation using male
muscularity as a test case. Previous research showed that American men generally desire to be
more muscular, and I argue that American young adults desire to be differentially muscular
depending on whether they adopt a fast or slow LH strategy. I tested this hypothesis by assessing
in a survey American adult men’s LH strategy and their desired level of muscularity. Analyses
revealed a significant positive correlation between depression (measuring the K-dimension of LH
strategy) and men’s desires for muscularity (compared to their baseline muscularity) when they
were considering a short-term but not a long-term relationship. There was no evidence that
measures of mate competition (another major dimension of LH strategy) correlated with desires
for muscularity for either short-term or long-term relationships. These findings provided partial
support for the LH hypothesis of men’s desires for muscularity.
Description:M.A. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62281
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.A. - Communicology


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