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Utilizing Plant DNA Banks to Uncover Patterns of Fungal Diversity across the Hawaiian Islands within the Clermontia (Campanulaceae) Phyllosphere.

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Title:Utilizing Plant DNA Banks to Uncover Patterns of Fungal Diversity across the Hawaiian Islands within the Clermontia (Campanulaceae) Phyllosphere.
Authors:Datlof, Erin M.
Contributors:Botany (department)
Date Issued:May 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:DNA banks are used as storage repositories for genetic diversity of organisms
ranging from plants to insects to mammals throughout the world. These banks preserve
the genetic information for organisms of interest, however they also indirectly preserve
organisms’ associated microbiomes, including fungi associated with plant tissues. Studies
of fungal biodiversity lag far behind those of macroorganisms, such as plants and
estimates of global fungal richness are still widely debated. Utilizing previously collected
specimens to study patterns of fungal diversity could significantly increase our
understanding of overall patterns of biodiversity from snapshots in time. Here, I
investigated the fungi inhabiting the phyllosphere among species of the endemic
Hawaiian plant genus, Clermontia (Campanulaceae). From just 20 DNA bank samples
collected throughout the main Hawaiian Islands using next generation DNA amplicon
sequencing, I uncovered approximately 1,780 fungal operational taxonomic units. Using
these historic samples, I tested the macroecological pattern of decreasing community
similarity with decreasing geographic proximity. I found a significant distance decay
pattern among Clermontia associated fungal communities. This study also provides the
first insights into elucidating patterns of microbial diversity through the use of DNA bank
repository samples.
Description:M.S. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62213
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: M.S. - Botany


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