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Kūkulu Ola Hou. Rebuilding Native Hawaiian Health by Reconnecting Ancestral Practices of Traditional Medicine: An Inventory of Researched Customs, Rituals, and Practices Relating to Hawaiian Mai.

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Title:Kūkulu Ola Hou. Rebuilding Native Hawaiian Health by Reconnecting Ancestral Practices of Traditional Medicine: An Inventory of Researched Customs, Rituals, and Practices Relating to Hawaiian Mai.
Authors:Fox, Leanne K.
Contributors:Biomedical Sciences (department)
Keywords:Native Hawaiian health
disease classification
traditional medicine
Date Issued:May 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:This qualitative health study examined customs, rituals, and practices relating to Hawaiian maʻi, —kānaka ʻōiwi perceptions of imbalance, illness, sickness and disease—and produced a comprehensive inventory of findings. Maʻi shape biomedical classification of illness by Native Hawaiians from their Ka „Oihana Mauli Ola; recounted here from the nosology within their traditional Hawaiian health structure. A Hawaiian medical epistemological framework was developed to conduct this mixed method study across eight arms before interpreting both ancient and contemporary knowledge and beliefs. Primary data collection consisted of key informant interviews (N=25) and one focus group (N=25) sampling from experts and learners of traditional Hawaiian medicine. Secondary data collection, synthesis and analyses were conducted in English and ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi utilizing over 100,000 records in multiple archives (N=11). Study significance indicates the first comprehensive medical inventory documenting knowledge of Hawaiian maʻi across time periods and traditional practices, systematically referencing more than 7,000 Hawaiian maʻi terms and dozens of unique disease classes and categories. Findings suggest this integrative medical inventory and taxonomy can inform the diagnostic process and improve diagnosis procedures for health care and prevention. Further, it can create new quality standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services for Native Hawaiian health.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62197
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Biomedical Sciences


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