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The Association between Occupational Exposure to Pesticides and Cardiovascular Disease Incidence: The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program.

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Title:The Association between Occupational Exposure to Pesticides and Cardiovascular Disease Incidence: The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program.
Authors:Berg, Zara K.
Contributors:Biomedical Sciences (department)
Date Issued:May 2017
Publisher:University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Abstract:Previously, Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program researchers reported that occupational exposure to pesticides is significantly associated with total mortality.
Objective: The current study examines occupational exposure to pesticides on the job in relation to incident cardiovascular diseases (CVD), that is, coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence and cerebrovascular accident (CVA) incidence, combined. Methods: Using the OSHA exposure scale as an estimate of exposure, statistical analyses were performed using a cohort of 7,557 Japanese-American men from The Kuakini Honolulu Heart Program.
Results: In the first 10 years of follow-up of the cohort, a positive correlation was observed between age-adjusted CVD incidence and pesticide exposure with a p-value of 0.021. This relationship remained significant after adjustment for other CVD risk factors. No significant association for coronary heart disease or stroke incidence and pesticide exposure was observed when examined separately, possibly due to a smaller number of events. The biochemical mechanisms leading to CVD and associated risk factors will be discussed.
Conclusion: These results are novel, as the association between occupational exposure to pesticides and cardiovascular disease incidence has not been examined previously in this cohort. These findings may contribute to our understanding of the role of occupational exposure to pesticides plays in the development of cardiovascular diseases.
Description:Ph.D. Thesis. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa 2017.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62043
Rights:All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections: Ph.D. - Biomedical Sciences


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