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A Conceptual Architecture for Enabling Future Self-Adaptive Service Systems

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Title:A Conceptual Architecture for Enabling Future Self-Adaptive Service Systems
Authors:Burzlaff, Fabian
Bartelt, Christian
Keywords:Software Development for Self-Adaptation in Services, Wearables, and IoT Devices
Software Technology
Knowledge-driven Architecture Composition, Integration Knowledge, Self-Adaptive Systems, Internet of Things
Date Issued:08 Jan 2019
Abstract:Dynamic integration methods for unknown data sources and services at system design time are currently primarily driven by technological standards. Hence, little emphasis is being placed on integration methods. However, the combination of heterogeneous data sources and services offered by devices across domains is hard to standardize. In this paper, we will shed light on the interplay of self-adaptive system architectures as well as bottom-up, incremental integration methods relying on formal knowledge bases. An incremental integration method has direct influences on both the system architecture itself and the way these systems are engineered and operated during design and runtime. Our findings are evaluated in the context of a case study that uses an adapted bus architecture including two tool prototypes. In addition, we illustrate conceptually how control loops such as MAPE-K can be enriched with machine-readable integration knowledge.
Pages/Duration:10 pages
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/60184
ISBN:978-0-9981331-2-6
DOI:10.24251/HICSS.2019.899
Rights:Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections: Software Development for Self-Adaptation in Services, Wearables, and IoT Devices


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