Browsing Taro by Issue Date

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  • Sedgwick, T.F. (Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, 1902)
    This bulletin starts with a history of taro, its cultivation in Hawaii, and a general discussion of taro root rot. Experiments done in 1901 and 1902 investigated the role of fertilization and irrigation in disease incidence.
  • Sedgwick, T.F. (University of Hawaii, 1903)
    This bulletin is a Hawaiian language synopsis of the English language Bulletin No. 2, The root rot of taro, by the same author.
  • Wilcox, E.V.; Clowes, F.A. (Paiia e ka Paredaiso o ka Pakipikia, 1911)
    This is a general guide to the cultivation of taro. It includes sections on wet land taro, dry land taro, and planting.
  • Allen, O.N.; Allen, Ethel K. (Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, 1933-11)
    The bulletin reviews the history and present conditions of taro culture and poi making in Hawaii and discusses the preparation of poi from the bacteriological standpoint.
  • Whitney, Leo D.; Bowers, F.A.I.; Takahashi, M. (Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, 1939)
    Taro, one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world, has long been a staple food of the natives of all the Polynesian islands as well as in the West Indies and the Orient. Since taro is propagated almost exclusively by ...
  • Parris, G.K. (University of Hawaii, 1941-05)
    Taro cultivation practices under both flooded and non-flooded conditions are described, and the causes, symptoms, and control of the diseases causing leaf spots and corm rots are discussed in detail.
  • Kikuta, K.; Parris, G.K. (University of Hawaii, 1941-05)
    Rapid multiplication of taro plants by using corm sections was explored. Normally dormant buds on the corm can be stimulated to grow, and plantlets can be obtained from corm sections containing one of these buds. Buds on ...
  • Derstine, Virginia; Rada, Edward L. (University of Hawaii, 1952-07)
    The bulletin is a thorough review of the nutritional qualities of poi, particularly as a food for babies, convalescents, and people with digestive problems. The survey revealed that doctors in Hawaii are widely aware of ...
  • De la Pena, Ramon S (Ramon Serrano), 1936 ([Honolulu], 1967)
    Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium were applied separately from 0 to 1120 kg/ha to upland and lowland taro. A 2 x 2 x 2 N-P-K interaction experiment was also conducted in pots using 0 and 15 grams of each element per plant. ...
  • Begley, Bryan W.; Spielmann, Heinz; Vieth, Gary R. (University of Hawaii, 1981-01)
    A questionnaire explored poi usage, frequency of purchase, and purchasers' buying behavior. The report discussed relationships between socioeconomic variables and consumption patterns. Ethnic Hawaiians were likely to be ...
  • Leung, PingSun; Sato, Dwight (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    This study provides an update of the cost and return of Chinese taro production in the Hilo area. Return to management is estimated to be $5,575 per acre per crop. Total fixed costs and variable costs are $1,573 and $4,602 ...
  • DeFrank, Joseph; Easton-Smith, Virginia A.; Leong, Gladys (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    A preliminary experiment with seven preemergence herbicides identified oxyfluorfen as a promising herbicide for commercial taro (Colocasia esculenta) production in Hawaii. Oxyfluorfen was applied twice at 0.38, 0.56 and ...
  • de la Pena, Ramon S. (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    The production of new crop varieties through hybridization is the only stable method of crop improvement. As a program, crop improvement through breeding has been a major project of most research centers and institutes. ...
  • Santos, George (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Critical steps of growing a successful crop of dryland taro are discussed. The sequence of steps are pre-plant land preparation, planting, weed control, fertilization, pest control, and harvesting. This article will provide ...
  • Kahumoku, George Jr. (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    A Native Hawaiian perspective on the origin of kalo (taro) and of taro cultivation in South Kona.
  • Lee, James (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Hawaii grown Chinese taro is in high demand in West Coast markets. Disease-free and year-round taro supply in addition to product identification are pre-requisites in establishing a market and meeting foreign competition. ...
  • Sato, Dwight; Silva, James; Kuniyoshi, James (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    This report summarizes the results of a single experiment in determining the phosphorus requirement for Chinese taro. Based upon the predicted results, 3,571 lbs treble superphosphate gave the highest no.1 and marketable ...
  • Foliaki, Sione; Sakai, William S.; Tongatule, Sauni T.; Tungata, Unlucky; Ka'ipo, Ron; Furutani, Sheldon C.; Tsang, Marcel M.C.; Nielson, Gregory; Short, Richard (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Production of six cultivars of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don. in the Piihonua area near Hilo on the Island of Hawaii ranged from a high of over 70,000 pounds per production acre for the cultivar Tonga to a low of 14,000 ...
  • Sato, Dwight; Silva, James A. (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Five plant spacing treatments and four fertilizer timing treatments were applied to Chinese taro grown for 9 months on land previously cropped to edible ginger. From our preliminary interpretation of the results, a 1 x 3 ...
  • Hollyer, James R.; Sato, Dwight M. (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Taro was, and continues to be, an important food for many people world-wide; at least 12.6 billion pounds of the genus Colocasia were consumed in 1987. In Hawaii, ancient lore states that one square mile of taro feed up ...

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