Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58605

Shifting Perception: Photographing Disabled People During the Civil Rights Era

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Item Summary

Title:Shifting Perception: Photographing Disabled People During the Civil Rights Era
Authors:Hiles, Timothy W.
Keywords:art history
enfreakment
“other”
Date Issued:2014
Publisher:University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies
Citation:Hiles, T. W. (2014). Shifting Perception: Photographing Disabled People During the Civil Rights Era. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 10(3 & 4).
Series:vol. 10, no. 3 & 4
Abstract:During the American Civil Rights Era, photographic perception of disabled people shifted from constructs that empowered the abled “normal” to an empathetic awareness of social isolation and enfreakment. Through rhetorics of the stare, photographers demonstrated increased cognizance of what it meant to be an “other” in a society that valued homogeneity.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58605
ISSN:1552-9215
Appears in Collections: RDS Volume 10, No. 3 & 4


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