Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58499

“Useless”: Disability, Slave Labor, and Contradiction on Antebellum Southern Plantations

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Item Summary

Title:“Useless”: Disability, Slave Labor, and Contradiction on Antebellum Southern Plantations
Authors:Boster, Dea Hadley
Keywords:African-American history
slavery
plantation labor
Date Issued:2011
Publisher:University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies
Citation:Boster, D. H. (2011). “Useless”: Disability, Slave Labor, and Contradiction on Antebellum Southern Plantations. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 7(3 & 4).
Series:vol. 7, no. 3 & 4
Abstract:African American slaves with disabilities (broadly defined as physical, mental or aesthetic conditions seen as unfavorable or impairing) performed a variety of duties on antebellum southern plantations. However, tensions between goals of production, profit, control, and planters’ expectations often created contradictory assessments of disability in slaves. Slaves with disabilities were also at risk of abuse—including corporeal punishment, neglect, and murder—from masters.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58499
ISSN:1552-9215
Appears in Collections: RDS Volume 7, No. 3 & 4


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