Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58269

Disaster Relief for Deaf Persons: Lessons from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

File Size Format  
1034.pdf 148.68 kB Adobe PDF View/Open
1033.docx 26.78 kB Microsoft Word XML View/Open
1035.txt 26.26 kB Text View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Disaster Relief for Deaf Persons: Lessons from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
Authors:White, Barbara
Keywords:disaster preparedness
Hurricane Katrina
deaf organizations
Date Issued:2006
Publisher:University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies
Citation:White, B. (2006). Disaster Relief for Deaf Persons: Lessons from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 2(3).
Series:vol. 2, no. 3
Abstract:Victims of disasters who are deaf face unique and insurmountable obstacles in accessing disaster relief. The response to deaf disaster victims of Hurricane Katrina is an example of how the Federal government failed this population, particularly the community of Deaf African Americans who lived in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward. In the aftermath of this disaster, the natural helping networks of the deaf community and its organizations proved to be more effective than the organized relief agencies. The author, a deaf social worker, spent two weeks in the Gulf region assisting deaf evacuees who fled both Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita during the now infamous hurricanes of 2005.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58269
ISSN:1552-9215
Appears in Collections: RDS Volume 2, No. 3


Please email libraryada-l@lists.hawaii.edu if you need this content in ADA-compliant format.

Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.