Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58174

Fostering the Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Skills of College Students with Disabilities through a College Success Class

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Item Summary

Title:Fostering the Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Skills of College Students with Disabilities through a College Success Class
Authors:Lamb, Peg
Keywords:self-determination
self-advocacy
postsecondary success
Date Issued:2004
Publisher:University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies
Citation:Lamb, P. (2004). Fostering the Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Skills of College Students with Disabilities through a College Success Class. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 2(2).
Series:vol. 1, no. 2
Abstract:Students with disabilities are entering postsecondary education in greater numbers; however, they experience great difficulty in completing their programs. One factor contributing to their lack of success is the discrepancy in the laws that govern educational support in secondary and postsecondary education. An additional factor is limited development of self-determination/self-advocacy skills when students exit high school. Bridges, a National Science Foundation three-year transition project, piloted a College Success Class at Lansing [Michigan] Community College with the dual purpose of supporting student transition to college and developing self-determination and self-advocacy skills. Data suggests that through classroom activities and follow-up meetings, students developed a greater understanding of these concepts, more confidence, and the ability to advocate with college instructors for their accommodations.
URI/DOI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58174
ISSN:1552-9215
Appears in Collections: RDS Volume 1, No. 2


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