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Research Synthesis on Assistive Technology use by People with Learning Disabilities and Difficulties

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dc.contributor.author Roberts, Kelly Drew
dc.contributor.author Stodden, Robert A.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-08T22:57:06Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-08T22:57:06Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation Roberts, K. D. & Stodden, Robert A. (2004). Research Synthesis on Assistive Technology use by People with Learning Disabilities and Difficulties. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 2(2).
dc.identifier.issn 1552-9215
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/58173
dc.description.abstract In this article, we provide a synthesis of the literature available on the use of assistive technology (AT) by elementary through postsecondary education students with learning disabilities and/or difficulties. The synthesis addresses the following questions: 1. What types of AT are being used in educational and workplace settings? 2. What are the outcomes for students with learning disabilities and difficulties who use AT? 3. What types of AT, as used by students with learning disabilities and difficulties, necessitate additional research, and 4. Does the use of AT improve performance and retention rates? Answers to these questions are based upon analysis of seven articles found through an extensive literature search based upon the following criteria: (a) Empirical studies on AT; (b) Studies published in refereed journals; (c) Study participants attending elementary through postsecondary educational institutions; (d) Non-mainstreamed technologies (i.e. technology not used regularly by people without disabilities such as spell checkers, grammar checkers, word processing software, educational software); (e) Technology that is used to compensate for learning difficulties and not used to remediate, and (f) Study participants identified as having a learning disability or learning difficulty. Overall, the use of AT as a compensatory strategy by students with learning disabilities and/or difficulties was shown to be effective.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher University of Hawaii at Manoa -- Center on Disability Studies
dc.relation.ispartofseries vol. 1, no. 2
dc.subject assistive technology
dc.subject learning disabilities or difficulties
dc.subject voice recognition software
dc.title Research Synthesis on Assistive Technology use by People with Learning Disabilities and Difficulties
dc.type Forums
dc.type.dcmi Text
Appears in Collections: RDS Volume 1, No. 2


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